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Saturday, April 22, 2017

Books, Books, Swimming in a Sea of Books

E-reading devices have made me a fiction-reading junkie. Hooked on Books was the name of a used book store up the road, which is sadly now closed because they sold paper books. But the books I buy on non-paper are proliferating like rabbits in springtime on my e-reading devices. I am so very hooked because of the ease of reading. On my phone, I always have a book with me.

I’m about to launch a book of my own, The Renaissance Club, a time-travel novel set in Italy involving the great Baroque sculptor Gianlorenzo Bernini and a contemporary young art historian who specializes in–him. Fortchoming from Fiery Seas Publishing, the novel will appear as an e-book original and paperback. While I love that it will be both on paper and the ether, to suit different reading tastes, I’m an e-only reader. My eyes and hands like holding a Kindle better than a paperback. And I can turn pages faster, read more books (on my iPhone in the dark!) and consequently, have begun to simply consume novels. So I'm hoping that the e-version will be the popular one.

I now have — I blush to admit it — almost 100 books on my e-reading app, which means accessible on all my devices. A sea of books. What, for a reader and writer, could be more delicious?

What do you think of this cover mock-up for The Renaissance Club?

Comments welcome!



Wednesday, April 12, 2017

New website for THE RENAISSANCE CLUB - my novel's upcoming debut


New novel, new author website. Sounds simple, doesn't it? I've looked at so many author sites and the ones that stick with me are SO SIMPLE! Simple is hard. And I'm short of funds to pay a really great designer. As the daughter of a painter, however, I have my esthetic tastes, and as the daughter of a rocket engineer (same guy), I have my HTML skills. So -- drum roll, please -- here's the new author website for Rachel Dacus.
My new slogan: "In my world, love always wins." And I stick by that philosophy. I'd love feedback, comments, anything you have to say about the website or anything. When it comes time for cover design, I'll be asking for your opinion too! In fact, maybe I'll make some kind of contest out of it, a free ebook of THE RENAISSANCE CLUB for the winning comments. Or something like that! 

As I may have mentioned, James McAvoy is my pick to play the complicated, volatile genius Bernini in the film that I very much hope they're going to make of THE RENAISSANCE CLUB! The part of May Gold has yet to be cast in my imagination, but I'm working on it. Curly long dark hair, a curious and sometimes mischievous look in her large, dark eyes. Thoughts?

Monday, April 10, 2017

What a Writer Can Learn from HAMILTON

This lucky writer of plays, poems, and novels got to see the spectacularly innovative musical theater that is Hamilton. Having listened to the recording at least ten times, watched every Youtube clip of the musical numbers at least five times each, I could have rapped or sung along with many of the numbers. Yet in many ways, I was unprepared for the play itself, its drama and intensity, its organization of themes and events. 

So in one performance -- probably the only one I'll get to see for a long time -- I had a lot to learn, and I had to learn it on the fly.

The biggest surprise -- immediately -- was the near absence of non-rap dialogue. The story  proceeded by one after another spectacular number -- the kind that usually begins and ends a show. And each number, or many, were highly narrative. There was in-the-moment action, of course, but a lot of character-as-his-own-narrator speeches, delivered in rap, fast or slow, but almost always rhythmic. So there was a stylization in every scene, every song, that reminded me of Shakespearean speeches, with a kind of formal structure you don't see in musical plays, unless it's Shakespeare or opera. Rap, after all, is a form of poetry, and so the comparison to Shakespeare's rhythmic and often rhymed lines isn't surprising, after all.

My second surprise was the pacing. The whole show was thrillingly beyond fast. At a certain point, you just settle into being bombarded with content and you absorb as fast as you can. Regular musicals let you absorb plot in normally paced dialogue before the next huge production number hits, tying it  together. This show makes you learn the story through extravaganza. You scarcely catch your breath before plunging off on another wild ride again. It's like surfing monster waves.

I guess the most surprising thing to me was how much narrative was embedded in this history musical, often by the character about himself or herself. That's really a unique way to put a story together. I'll be thinking about that for a long, long time. And when I got back to bingeing on Hamilton songs and raps, it will be with an analytical writer's eye. What can I replicate here, how can I use the formality of rhythm or some other device to create structure? And where can you rent those stage turntables?



Saturday, March 25, 2017

Casting the Film Bernini from My Novel THE RENAISSANCE CLUB

The Renaissance Club by Rachel Dacus, Fiery Seas Publishing (forthcoming).

That felt good to type! Today I'm handing over my final manuscript to the publisher. It feels like handing over the controls of my airplane in mid-flight. Next, they wrap the book with a cover. Very important element. I can't help but  imagine casting Gianlorenzo Bernini, around whom the story unfolds, for the movie. Here he is in his self-portrait, age 26, an image that was part of my inspiration to write the book. Who could play the temperamental, charismatic artist?


JAMES MCAVOY


Don't you think McAvoy would be fantastic in the role? I thought of him because of his thrilling portrayal of Jane Austen's love interest in the movie Becoming Jane. But what if they made The Renaissance Club as a musical -- then it must be Chris Pine!! We can darken his hair. I'll write the lyrics, unless Stephen Sondheim wants to. How great is Captain Kirk singing as the Prince in this clip from Into the Woods?

CHRIS PINE



IF WE CAST LIN-MANUEL MIRANDA, HE CAN BRING HIS OWN COSTUME!


Saturday, March 11, 2017

Which Broadway Musical Illustrates Your Writing Process?



I'm having a Saturday writing morning that's deep into Crazy Lady Writer Head, thanks to too many exciting things to to work on at once. Plus my work-in-progress new novel, I have a novel to edit, a play to finish, a poetry manuscript to edit, and a memoir to edit. I feel like the bride above, who almost wants to call it off when it comes down to really doing the thing.

It's been a wild ride in my writing world since early February, when I had two offers to publish my debut novel The Renaissance Club, an expression of strong interest (with request for changes) for my next poetry collection, Arabesque, and even interest from a publisher in reviewing my memoir, Rocket Lessons. The thing is, I promised a lot to many, and now I'm facing the Saturday morning page like a sweaty-nervous bride.

See the above video for a glimpse of my writing process today. I think we all should talk about our writing processes not in the usual bland narrative terms, but as illustrated by Broadway musicals. Writing is all about the qualities of the Broadway musical: brightness, energy, force, and action. And an insane belief that inspiration --- like love --- will always win.

Here's a more upbeat glimpse of my usual Saturday writing space, which I'm trying to get into today --- Anything Goes:


If you had to pick a Broadway number to illustrate your writing head today, which one would it be?


Tuesday, February 07, 2017

My Favorite Fictional Sweethearts

Valentine's Day approaches, and over on Goodreads, someone asked me what are my favorite fictional couples. I cheated, of course, and managed to get in three pairs of lovers.

First, I'd have to say Romeo and Juliet.
There's nothing like starry-eyed and highly sexed young lovers spouting the world's most enchanting, poetic love lines  as they barrel toward their doom.

Right behind that pair are, for me, Jane Austen and Tom Lefroy in the book and movie BECOMING JANE. I'm a devoted Austenite, and would of course include all her lovers, Emma and Mr. Knightley first among them.

The biodrama about their author, starring the compelling James McAvoy, is based on an imagined (but possible) love affair between Jane and the Irishman. I love that story because the demise of their plan to run away together rests on noble feelings on both sides. They recognize what in the long run would be best for the other. Swooning and spiritual upliftment, quite a combo! They're in some ways the opposite of Romeo and Juliet.

Tuesday, January 31, 2017

The Story with Sisters

Sibling relationships and specifically sisters is what I'm thinking about. I'm finishing a new novel. It's about two half-sisters who feud about an inherited cottage in Italy with its resident ghost of the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley.

Sisters -- we love to explore these complicated lifetime pairings. In real life and literature, sisters stand out. From Jane Austen with her siblings, to Emily Dickinson and hers, to those fabulous Brontes, the stories of siblings have made a huge impact on us, even if we're only children. We devour the sisters who are subjects of novels, in a sister-craze that isn't new, but seems like a current trend. Reading about sisters makes us consider our connections and how they affect our lives.  

I've been thinking a lot about that, following my brother's death. It's a subject that fascinates me and one I'm going to be exploring as I spend the month of February finishing the first draft of my new book.  

Sense and Sensibility is my favorite sisters story. I love the contrast in personality between the two, the tension hovering around the core of sisterly love, and the way their stories intertwine. I patterned my sisters on Elinor and Marianne Dashwood, because their differences fascinate me. In contemporary language, their story is one of reconciling the values of logic with feeling -- a journey we all have to take. Having your opposite in your family life, while often frustrating, is the magic formula to growth and wholeness. And that's what my story is about. That's what all my stories are about. The journey to that more full existence.

And I threw in a dash of Brontes, so of course my sisters are both writers.



Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Deaths in Karmic Batches

I've read that when people reincarnate, they may do so in batches, sticking together for their progressive learning. I find the idea mostly pleasing. But I hadn't thought about how that might call for group exits. This fall-winter has knocked me on the head with two deaths. First my beloved brother (my only sibling) on October 10. Now my stepmother, January 19, last week.

Death's absoluteness blindsided me. You can't plead for just one more phone call or visit. You can't ask a departed person to send you an occasional text message saying  they're doing fine in that foreign country called the afterlife. Whatever language they speak there is mostly incomprehensible to me. Grief is in the silence.

To process my karmic batch of exits, I write, of course. Today my stepmother's body is being cremated. It's a hard fact. I awoke into it not happy. But the impenetrable is what writers write to penetrate. We try to write our way behind the curtain, even when that's impossible.

Death Is Not Subjective

You can’t negotiate it, finesse, or spin
it visceral skull-hardness
into soft-sweet resonance. You can’t flex it.

When I touched her folded, white hands,
I felt permanence. And impermanence
seared me in its icicle grip. I forgot to eat
all the rest of that day,

but then I followed it with a binge,
because while I am still alive
I need to learn the lessons of being
by hand, tongue, skin, and muscle.

By illness and overeating,
exercise, and petting my dog’s
silky strands. Chill fog is the right element
today, this day of a disembodiment,

winter tucking deeply in, life whirling
in sharp flakes inward,
behind a white curtain.

The road ahead
unclear, yet I travel
deep into the till then unknown.

I need to cherish even fatigue,
and remember what my brother told me
on his last day: to hug harder.
A hug is not subjective.

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

More Embarrassing Riches in Poetry Publishing

The end of 2016 was very lucky for my poetry publishing. In this second installment on an embarrassment of riches, I'm delighted to share my poem, "Bird Bones", which was recently published in the redoubtable Prairie Schooner.

Thanks, editors!

I also had work published in Eclectica's 20th anniversary anthology, Prairie Schooner, Atlanta Review, Panoply (who very kindly nominated my poem for a Pushcart Prize!) and Peacock Journal (where they put beauty first).

Prairie Schooner had published some of my poems before, but as it's a top literary magazine, it's always a thrill when they grab something. And I'm always surprised by what they accept, as I was with the very first set of two poems they took. It's a print-only journal. Here is a photo of the poem page:


The PS issue is full of stellar poets and writers, people I'm proud to be among. I really recommend getting a copy. And not just to read my poem (you just did that). I recommend reading in all these journals. Gorgeous, breathtaking, heartbreaking, soul-awakening work in every one of these magazines. You won't be sorry.










Saturday, January 07, 2017

All My Imaginary Friends Have Superpowers

Because shouldn't we all have a little extra help? And also a friend you can always talk to, who understands everything the way you see it, or even if he doesn't, has wisdom gently offered? Yes, everyone should have this. 

In my completed novel, THE RENAISSANCE CLUB, (watch for announcement of its debut date), Renaissance genius sculptor and architect Bernini provides the magical wisdom and inspiration for young art historian May Gold, stuck in a going-nowhere teaching job, with a stick-in-the-mud boyfriend. As if Italy isn't magic enough on its own, she slips through a crack in time to come face to face with the tempestuous artist, staring straight into Bernini's eyes.

Well, what would you do if you could meet that one person in history who you've always admired-- maybe even studied and fantasized about? That's the way my tale unfolds. And the way May manages to make her not-so-imaginary but slipstream companion a reality in her life. I found the voice of Bernini urging me along as I wrote the story. It's a coming-of-artistic-age tale that rang deeply true for me. If you have to create, have courage and do it boldly. Think of the dynamic Bernini when you put your fingers on those keys, or the camera to your eye. 

My newest work in progress, THE ROMANTICS CLUB, also features an imaginary companion, in the person of a ghost. Two half-sisters clash over a bequest from their father, a cottage in Italy and its resident ghost, the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, until an explosion forces one sister to learn the price of putting property ahead of family.

What I love about my imaginary companions with superpowers is the way they tend to support and encourage my main characters. No ill-disposed ghosts or phantoms here! If you want a dark fantasy read, look elsewhere. My ghosts are well-intentioned, creative, and want you to be too.They also want you to be vicariously in Italy as often as possible. That should be classified as a superpower.







Friday, January 06, 2017

An Embarrassment of Riches

My literary stocking overflowed this December. but I was so busy I didn't have time to mention it to anyone but those who saw the stack of magazines on my coffee table. I'm taking it as a sign of the new year, a flowering, perspicacious publication kind of 2017. I also found a late December rose, two blooms that opened up and held for a miraculous week. All good omens for a new year. No matter what November made me feel, I'm feeling optimistic now.

Thanks to Dan Veach, outgoing editor of  The Atlanta Review, for selecting my poem "Rain Dance with Redwood" for this new issue. Judging by California's rainy season, and the impending "monster storm," I think the dancing works. Here's the first of four big print publications I have work in this winter! I'm so jazzed and so hopeful. A good state for January. Happy shiny, new 2017!